Certified Scrum Professional – Achievement Unlocked!

Scrum Alliance CSP logoAs of this afternoon, I am a CSP (Certified Scrum Professional) with the Scrum Alliance!

The CSP is a certification demonstrating a commitment to my continuing education in Agile and Scrum, and to the profession. The CSP requires a few years of experience as  a scrum team member, as well as 70 hours of continuing education, which might include independent study, Scrum Alliance training and conferences, non-Scrum Alliance trainings, and scrum-related volunteer work. My blog posts here, events, and Scrum Alliance articles also contributed to the certification. In addition, my coursework for the CSM and attendance at the Global Scrum Gathering in San Diego last month gave me both necessary education and SEU (Scrum Educational Units) for the certification.

I’ve been working towards my CSP since getting my CSM last year, and I am very proud of this accomplishment.



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Scrum Master Interview – What a Relief

Stephanie on scrum master interview dayI just had a terrific scrum master interview with a local company, and it was a huge relief! Not because the job is terrific (although I’m sure it will be if I get it), but because the hiring process has me meeting with the product owners and current scrum master in my first interview. I’m not meeting with executives or even the functional manager– at this stage, the company doesn’t even know who the my functional manager might be, because they haven’t decided which team would be the best fit!

I’ve had quite a few Scrum Master interviews in the past 2 months, and I can tell you– most people hiring scrum masters don’t know what they do. That’s usually fine– as a technical writer, I have coached hiring managers on how to interview me and other writers, even during the interview process. But when I come into an interview and I’m talking to product owners and scrum masters who want me to tell them how my last team worked, and demonstrate how I approached that role? That’s a huge relief.

A little bit of knowledge went a long way today. When we talk about “culture fit,” we usually often talk about work/life balance, office wardrobe, and whether there’s a ping pong table in the cafeteria. But for me, culture fit is about how much I have to push to get people to understand what I’m talking about. I don’t mind coaching, and a scrum master is always going to have a lot of opportunities to help the team learn and improve.

But I really love it when the company is already on that path, and I no longer have to explain what I do, just how I do it so well during the interview.